Native Plant Landscaping

Pollinator Conservation Efforts

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Zoom and Facebook Live

Saving the Earth, One Lawn at a Time

Join us for a special conversation with sustainability leader, Paul Tukey, Director of Environmental Stewardship at Glenstone Museum.

October 17, 2021 at 7:00pm
Free and open to the public.
1 hr 30 mins

Featured in media from Good Morning America to National Geographic, Tukey will share how he sustainably manages one of the most beautiful landscapes in America, the 300-acre Glenstone Museum grounds in Potomac, Maryland.

Learn the secrets of making a beautiful, safe, and healthy lawn with less mowing, less watering, and less fertilizing. You'll even lower your carbon footprint. Program will include Tukey's 45-minute talk with actionable steps and tools, followed by Q&A. Opening and closing reflections will be offered by local faith leaders.

Middletown’s Sustainability Committee applauds the town’s efforts in practicing sustainable land management. Residents are urged to learn as much as they can about the unsustainable plight of our pollinating species and to pursue the many simple ways to help. The Middletown Green Team and Sustainability Committee would like to share with the community more detailed information about how to make the transition to sustainable garden and lawn care practices.

Benefits of Native Plants:

 

Low maintenance:

Once established, native plants generally require little maintenance.

 

Beauty:

Many native plants offer beautiful showy flowers, produce abundant colorful fruits and seeds, and brilliant seasonal changes in colors from the pale, thin greens of early spring, to the vibrant yellows and reds of autumn.

Healthy Places for People:

Lawns and the ubiquitous bark-mulched landscapes are notorious for requiring profuse amounts of artificial fertilizers and synthetic chemical pesticides and herbicides. The traditional suburban lawn, on average, has 10x more chemical pesticides per acre than farmland. By choosing native plants for your landscaping, you are not only helping wildlife, but you are creating a healthier place for yourself, your family, and your community. 

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Video clip: Doug Tallamy

Native plants are those that occur naturally in a region in which they evolved. They are the ecological basis upon which life depends, including birds and people. Without them and the insects that co-evolved with them, local birds cannot survive. For example, research by the entomologist Doug Tallamy has shown that native oak trees support over 500 species of caterpillars whereas ginkgos, a commonly planted landscape tree from Asia, host only 5 species of caterpillars. When it takes over 6,000 caterpillars to raise one brood of chickadees, that is a significant difference.

Helping the Climate:

Landscaping with native plants can combat climate change. In addition to the reduced noise and carbon pollution from lawn mower exhaust, many native plants, especially long-living trees like oaks and maples, are effective at storing the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. 

Conserving Water:
Because native plants are adapted to local environmental conditions, they require far less water, saving time, money, and perhaps the most valuable natural resource, water.

Wildlife:
In addition to providing vital habitat for birds, many other species of wildlife benefits as well. The colorful array of butterflies and moths, including the iconic monarch, the swallowtails, tortoiseshells, and beautiful blues, are all dependent on very specific native plant species. Native plants provide nectar for pollinators including hummingbirds, native bees, butterflies, moths, and bats. They provide protective shelter for many mammals. The native nuts, seeds, and fruits produced by these plants offer essential foods for all forms of wildlife.

Source: https://www.audubon.org/content/why-native-plants-matter

Photo by Michelle Irgens

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